Landscape For Bodies by Carl Warner

Simply beautiful. I think these take the conversation of space and the body to a whole new level

A Collective Edit

Fingers Cave

Ever imagined what landscapes look like if they were human body parts?

Let’s not twist that brain any longer. Carl Warner, a photographer best known for his work called, “Foodscapes”, has kindly helped us re-imagined just that.

Lately, Warner is in the habit of making “Bodyscapes” after finding inspiration in the scenes of naked bodies in the dusty, rocky terrain of Michelangelo Antonioni’s film,Zabriskie Point. “I was fascinated by the relationship between body and landscape, and I have always been looking at my own body in terms of its form as something structural and sculptural,” Warner said via email.

Twin Peaks

Warner said, the human body is more limited in the types of angles and shapes it can make. “It is less versatile, but it is often the case that having some restriction pushes you harder creatively, which makes it all a worthwhile challenge,” 

“I usually have some sketches…

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An Inside Out portrait that delivers a message to drone operators

It is more political in nature, but Art nonetheless

TED Blog

jr_kpk_fullThis portrait of a girl tells a story larger than the massive piece of vinyl it is printed on. Unfurled in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa region of Pakistan, “#NotABugSplat” was created by a collection of artists and activists, using TED Prize winner JR’s Inside Out campaign, to send a message to drone operators, who reportedly call their kills “bug splats” because they appear small and grainy on screen. The idea is to “create empathy and introspection amongst drone operators,” explains the project website.

Below, an image JR posted about this Inside Out project via Instagram:

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Art Dubai 2014: An Expat’s Prespective

 

First, let me clarify that this is my first (and most likely last) Art Dubai. The event is an annual celebration of Contemporary Art in Dubai with adjacent events like the Art Week, Sikka Art Fair, Design Days etc.

View of the Madinat Canal
View of the Madinat Canal

Part of my experience of the event has been colored by living in countries with a longer history in fine arts like South Africa, India and Canada. However, knowing next to nothing about Contemporary Middle Eastern Art, I found the experience very educational.

View of the Art Dubai 2014 Venue from the Madinat
View of the Art Dubai 2014 Venue from the Madinat

Certain aspects of the event have been heavily commercialized, though I assume this is unavoidable in a heavily consumer driven economy like Dubai. For example, vending stalls sold food and beverages similar to what one might expect at a concert or sports stadium & the majority of attendees were more socialites than art aficionados. These minor criticisms aside the volume and quality of Middle Eastern art was a visual and intellectual delight.

I started my experience at the Art Dubai Modern section of the exhibition. The walk to the venue offered magnificent views of the Burj Al Arab and the Souk Madinat Jumeirah. It was disappointing to see that many artists were not in attendance, though they were represented by their Art Galleries.

Walk to the Art Dubai Modern section
Walk to the Art Dubai Modern section

I was particularly impressed with A Modernist Project for Lebanon by Michel Basbous. His sculptures echoed the archaeological value of Lebanon, while creating products that were unashamedly simple and modern.

Michel Basbous, A Modernist Project for Lebanon
Michel Basbous, A Modernist Project for Lebanon

Other artist’s work also caught my eye, specifically Syed Sadequain’s calligraphic, vast works and Anwar Jalal Shemza’s clear, precise aesthetic.

Anwar Jalal Shemza
Anwar Jalal Shemza
Syed Sadequain
Syed Sadequain

The Art Dubai Projects exhibition was much more prolific with works by Lalla Essaydi and Wiley Kehinde. In particular, seeing Lalla Essaydi’s response to early 20th Century Orientalism was interesting. Her female figures are also objectified, though at least, they do force a dialogue on Orientalism. The most striking piece of the exhibition was Place Soweto (National Assembly II) by Wiley Kehinde. The larger than life piece was both absorbing and confrontational.

Wiley Kehinde Place Soweto
Wiley Kehinde, Place Soweto, Oil on Canvas 305 x 229 cm, Galerie Daniel Templeton
Lalla Essaydi
A response to Orientalism

I was also fortunate enough to attend a conversation with Taus Makhacheva and Stephanie Bailey on Makhacheva’s art. She first explored the idea of obscenely ostentatious weddings in her native Dagestan. I especially liked her comments on her other work Endeavour. She said “[Endeavour] is about life…you know…me pushing against a rock for about 9 minutes and then giving up.”

Endeavour by Makhacheva
Endeavour by Makhacheva
Makhacheva's Talk on Dagestani Bridal Culture
Makhacheva’s dialogue on Dagestani Bridal Culture with Stephanie Bailey

The Cartier room was another highlight of the exhibition. If you are not impressed by their impressive craftsmanship on traditional jewelry, then their crystal “city-like” project more than compensated with its aesthetic, conceptual value and execution.

Cartier Sculpture
Cartier Sculpture
Cartier Sample
Cartier Sample

Overall, the exhibition was not a “traditional” art show in the sense that a gallery patron from a more developed art market may expect, but it was certainly educational and relayed more of the questions that Middle Eastern artists and collectors are grappling with than I expected.

 

View of the Venue by Night
View of the Venue by Night

 

LEGO Piece
LEGO Piece